Archive | 3553(c)

Monday, August 28th, 2017

Second Circuit Vacates Sentence Based on Erroneous PSR

Today, in United States v. Genao, the Second Circuit vacated an illegal reentry sentence as procedurally unreasonable where the sentencing court relied on a factually erroneous presentence investigation report (PSR) to calculate the defendant’s Guidelines range. The opinion is notable both for its analysis of whether an offense under the New York burglary statute is a “crime of violence” and its determination that the district court failed to satisfy § 3553(c)’s requirement that it provide reasons for its sentence in open court.

You can access the opinion here.

Roman Bartolo Genao was convicted of illegal reentry, and had previously been convicted in New York state of first-degree robbery and first-degree burglary. At the time of Genao’s sentencing, the Guidelines imposed a 16-level enhancement for illegal reentry sentences where the defendant had previously been convicted of a “crime of violence.” (This Guideline has since been revised to impose enhancements based …


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Categories: 3553(c), Johnson, plain error, procedural reasonableness, sentencing

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Saturday, January 19th, 2008

OPEN SESAME

Two recent cases provide some guidance on the requirement in 18 U.S.C. § 3553(c) that the district court state in “open court” its reasons for imposing a particular sentence.

1. United States v. Day, No. 05-4285-cr (2d Cir. January 15, 2008) (Jacobs, Pooler, Sack, CJJ) (per curiam) is particularly shocking. Day was originally sentenced to fifteen years’ imprisonment, after having been convicted of one offense with a ten-year mandatory minimum and one with a five-year mando. In 2006, the circuit, in a summary order, vacated the sentence because it appeared from the record that Judge Platt erroneously believed that the two minima had to run consecutively.

On remand, Judge Platt, without notice to anyone, and in the absence of Day and his counsel, filed an order resentencing him to the same 180-month sentence. The circuit reversed, naturally, holding that the district court violated Day’s constitutional right to be present at …

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Categories: 3553(c), Uncategorized

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Categories: 3553(c), Uncategorized

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